Friday, April 16th, 2010...12:00 am

Letting Go of Dying Marigolds

Lifeless by Rodrigo Neves

On Monday, TheGardenLady wrote a post that answered a question from a Cassie about getting marigolds to bloom.  Here’s a follow-up question from Cassie.

So should I just throw away the pathetic looking stems and the root ball?

Cassie, I would not waste any more of your precious time on the pathetic looking stems and root ball of your dying or dead marigold. TheGardenLady would let your marigold plant go to plant heaven where all beloved plants, I hope, some day end up. Don’t just throw away the pathetic looking plant but add it to your compost pile so that it can become rich compost material that will help in creating great new soil to help grow the new beautiful plants you will now plant. Go to a local garden store where they sell marigold plants or buy a seed packet of marigold seeds and start anew. It will be much more of a rewarding experience starting over with new plants or seeds. It is relatively cheap to buy marigold plants. You will be much more assured of success with the new plantings whereas trying to nurse a pathetic looking plant back to health can be very frustrating. With rarer or more expensive plants it might be more of a worthwhile challenge to doctor them. But even the best gardeners would not work so hard to rescue a marigold unless it was a very, very rare marigold.

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2 Comments

  • If you have a spent marigold with dried up flowers still on it, you can harvest the seeds from the flowers and use those to start new marigolds.
    Marigolds grow easily from these seeds.
    Zinnias, bachelor buttons and poppies are others that are easy to start from last year’s harvested seeds. Just break apart the old dried up flower and you will find seeds!

  • If you have a spent marigold with dried up flowers still on it, you can harvest the seeds from the flowers and use those to start new marigolds.Marigolds grow easily from these seeds.Zinnias, bachelor buttons and poppies are others that are easy to start from last year’s harvested seeds. Just break apart the old dried up flower and you will find seeds!
    +1

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